Theodore Levin

Spring '18 press on Professor Ted Levin and “Qyrq Qyz”

Professor Ted Levin is quoted in three recent articles about his work on Qyrq Qyz, which was produced in part with the Music Department and the Hopkins Center for the Arts.

 

From "Mighty Women Warriors, Resurrected From an Ancient Epic" in The New York Times:

“'Nomads adopted Islam in syncretic forms that assimilated and preserved myriad local practices and beliefs, many of them connected to veneration of spirits and various forms of shamanism,' said Ted Levin, a musicologist and an expert on Central Asia at Dartmouth College, who has worked with the American cellist Yo-Yo Ma to promote the region’s culture in the West."

 

From "Ancient Instruments And Modern Media Tell A Tale Of Women Warriors" on Vermont Public Radio:

Songs of the Silk Road (ABC Radio National)

As a guest on ABC Radio National’s “Into the Music,” Dartmouth’s Theodore Levin talks about the history of recording music along the Silk Road. Levin, the Arthur R. Virgin Professor of Music, began journeying along the Silk Road in the 1970s to record local musicians, the story notes.

“When I came to the region in the 1970s I asked around,” says Levin. “I wanted to know, who are the best musicians? Who should I go listen to? And of course, it was hard then. It was the cold war and not everyone felt comfortable inviting an American into their house. But by the end of the ’80s, beginning of the ’90s, those trepidations had dissipated and I was able to gain access to really the finest musicians of the region.”

Listen to the full story, broadcast 1/10/15 by ABC Radio National.

Faculty Consider Folk Singer Pete Seeger’s Legacy

Folk singer Pete Seeger, who died January 27 at age 94, was no stranger to Dartmouth. He sang at the College a number of times and, say faculty members, has been an influence on their work, and in their lives.

Seeger played 105 Dartmouth Hall in 1957 and by 1968 he was making at least his fourth appearance in Hanover, a benefit on campus for the Upper Valley Human Rights Council.

In between, in April 1961, following his contempt of court conviction by the U.S. House Un-American Activities Committee, campus radio station WDCR devoted special programing to Seeger, in protest of the charges, says Jay Satterfield, Dartmouth Special Collections librarian.

There’s a particular segment of Seeger’s work preserved in the online Dartmouth Jewish Sound Archive, which Professor of Hebrew Studies Lewis Glinert curates with Professor of Engineering Alexander Hartov.