Ashley Fure

Assistant Professor Ashley Fure's "Filament" at NY Philharmonic

Professor Ashley Fure's "Filament" premiered at the New York Philharmonic's season-opening gala on September 20, and is the subject of a September 18 New York Times feature by Joshua Barone:

"Ms. Fure thinks concerts are a little weird. If the music we hear is just sound waves traveling through the air, she said in an interview, then 'we’re coming together to let air bump up against us. It’s a strange collective act.' This perspective — looking at music as something physical — is at the heart of much of Ms. Fure’s work, which deals in sound environments more than melodic lines. 'Filament' is no exception."

Read the full article here.

Anthony Tommasini's reviewed "Filament" for the New York Times on September 21:

Professor Ashley Fure's show reviewed in The New Yorker

From Dartmouth News:

In the News: Infrasound Opera: on Ashley Fure’s ‘The Force of Things’
“The staggering originality of Fure’s latest work ... makes one think that mostly female seasons might have to become the norm,” writes The New Yorker about Assistant Professor of Music Ashley Fure’s new experimental music-theater piece.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

 

Prof. Ashley Fure in The New York Times

Alice Gregory features Assistant Professor Ashley Fure in an article in The New York Times about women in the history of classical music.

"IN THE SUMMER OF 2014, “Something to Hunt,” by the American composer Ashley Fure, 32 at the time, had its premiere at the prestigious Internationale Ferienkurse für Neue Musik in Darmstadt, Germany.... In August, Ms. Fure returned to Darmstadt for the biannual festival’s 70th anniversary. The organizers had furnished her with archival data about its history, and Ms. Fure found the underrepresentation of women to be even worse than she had expected. "

Read the NY Times article.

Ashley Fure Receives Funding for New Project

From Dartmouth Now

Funding Initiative Chooses 10 Innovative Faculty Projects

7 Stages: An Electroacoustic Object Opera

Ashley Fure, Arts and Sciences, Music
Development of a series of kinetic sound art objects featured in a multi-disciplinary performance titled 7 Stages. The funding covers design and fabrication of Arduino-controlled mechanisms that make a cast of “object characters” transform throughout the performance. Fure, who begins work at Dartmouth on July 1, is the composer of the opera, which explores the hidden lives of objects devoid of human gaze.